Cheryl Kerr | Franconia Real Estate, Littleton Real Estate, Burke Real Estate, Peacham Real Estate


Houseplants are a great way to make your home feel more comfortable, colorful, and--in the winter--to bring a bit of living nature back into your life until spring arrives.

There are houseplants that will thrive in just about any location of your home. Plus, you can find houseplants that are low-maintenance or ones that are a bit more rewarding as you care for them and watch them grow.

In today’s post, I’m going to list the best houseplants for each room of your home. I’ll cover “impossible to kill” low-maintenance plants and some that require a bit more work. I’ll also cover large and small plants, as the size will often depend on the available space in the rooms of your home.

Read on for the list of the best houseplants for each room of your home.

Bedroom

The bedroom is a place for rest and relaxation. You don’t want anything too high maintenance or too big and bright. Lavender gives off a calming scent that is perfect for your cozy sleeping space.

Lavender is relatively low-maintenance, just be sure to water sparsely in the winter time, and only when the soil has dried out completely to avoid root rot.

Lavender works in other rooms as well, such as on a kitchen windowsill where it can be used for cooking.

Bathroom

The bathroom tends to be a humid place without much spare room. A single aloe vera plant near a light source can be a great accent.

Extremely low maintenance and useful after a day out in the sun, the bathroom is a perfect home for aloe vera. Simply snap off a leaf and use the gel inside for your burn.

Office

There are a few choice places for plants in the home office. A large snake plant in the corner of the room is a great way to add some life and color. Similarly, a money tree is easy to care for and fun to watch grow as you braid its stem (and what’s a more fitting place for a money tree than the place where you make your money!?).

For the desk, a small cactus or succulent will do the trick, as you don’t want it to take up too much room.

Living room

For the living room, we can finally start talking about some of the bigger houseplants on the list. A Norfolk Island Pine looks like a small pine tree (though it technically isn’t one) and it can grow several feet high indoors. This is a great choice for homeowners in colder climates who don’t want to fill their house with unfitting tropical looking plants.

Palm and Yucca, on the other hand, are perfect for homes in warmer climates. They can grow several feet high and fill up empty spaces in a large living room with ease. There’s a reason these are used in so many hotel and office building lobbies--they’re easy to care for and can grow large enough to fill the void in a big building.

Windowless rooms

Most plants will need at least indirect sunlight to stay healthy through the year. But, if you have a windowless room in your home that you want to brighten up with a houseplant you have options.

Dracaena, snake plants, and creeping fig all grow well in little to no light and are easy to take care of.  


This Single-Family in Franconia, NH recently sold for $425,000. This style home was sold by Cheryl Kerr - Four Seasons Sotheby's International Realty.


Franconia, NH 03580

Single-Family

$449,000
Price
$425,000
Sale Price

4
Bedrooms
10
Rooms
2
Baths
Tucked away in the woods on just a touch over 5 acres, sits this contemporary cape just a mile from town. 4 bedrooms 2 baths, this home is smack in the middle of everything the White Mountains has to offer. Just a few minutes to Cannon and just a little further to Loon or Bretton Woods; endless hiking nearby, fishing, and more! Open concept kitchen and dining, with custom cabinetry, full basement ready to finish, and attached two car garage with ample storage for all the toys. Home is ready for a new family! Schedule your private viewing today!




When buying a house, especially your first home, it's all too easy to make impulsive decisions and fail to "see the forest for the trees."

Although it's impossible to ignore your emotional reactions to a house for sale, it's vital to look at the big picture and make sure there are no red flags being ignored or glossed over.

For example, if the foundation of the house looks unstable or the surrounding neighborhood is showing signs of deterioration, it's ultimately not going to matter how much you love the layout of the kitchen or the convenience of a first floor laundry room. Major problems can overshadow the desirable features of a home and have long-term implications on your finances (and sanity).

Even though the future marketability of a house may be the last thing on your mind when you're searching for your next home, it's a factor worth giving some serious thought to. When that aspect of home ownership is overlooked, it could result in headaches and possible financial loss down the road. While real estate generally has a tendency to appreciate in value over time, there are exceptions.

The good news is that many potential problems can be prevented by combining common sense with the advice of qualified professionals, such as an experienced, certified property inspector. If you're wondering what's covered in a typical home inspection, the American Society of Home Inspectors offers this overview: "The standard home inspector’s report will cover the condition of the home’s heating system; central air conditioning system (temperature permitting); interior plumbing and electrical systems; the roof, attic and visible insulation; walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors; the foundation, basement and structural components."

So while inspectors can't look behind every wall or accurately predict the remaining lifespan of an existing HVAC system, they can provide you with a lot of valuable tips, recommendations, and insights into the condition of a house for sale. Working with a top-notch real estate (buyer's) agent will also help you avoid many of the potential pitfalls of buying a home.

While nobody wants to move into a "money pit," the likelihood of finding a home that's absolutely perfect and doesn't need any repairs, updates, or improvements is extremely low. Home buyers who are too focused on perfection may eventually realize that their standards are unattainable. A successful search for a new home hinges on the ability to distinguish between a minor cosmetic problem, such as an unappealing paint color, and a major problem, like a basement that floods regularly or a roof that's been compromised by storms, falling branches, or long-term neglect.

Although home buyers have differing expectations when it comes to repairs, remodeling, decorating, and renovations, one thing's for sure: Everyone wants to add their own personal touches to a new home and make it feel and look like their own!


If you plan to sell your house in the foreseeable future, it often helps to declutter. That way, you can eliminate excess items from your house and make it easy for buyers to envision what life may be like if they purchase your residence.

Before you start to declutter, there are several steps that you should follow to achieve the best-possible results, and these are:

1. Consider Which Items That You Want to Keep

One homeowner's treasure is another's clutter, and vice-versa. Thus, you'll want to take a close look at your personal belongings and determine which items are keepers and which items are clutter.

If you find that you have lots of clutter, there is no need to worry. Remember, you can always sell excess items at a yard sale or online. You also may be able to donate various excess items to charity or give them to family members or friends.

2. Examine Clutter in Each Room of Your Home

Clutter rarely is confined to one room of a house. As such, you'll want to closely examine each room of your home and identify all clutter before you list your residence.

Oftentimes, it helps to make a home decluttering checklist that includes each area of your home. This checklist will enable you to take a room-by-room approach to remove clutter and may help you streamline the decluttering process.

3. Evaluate Your Storage Options

Although you likely will find plenty of clutter in your home, you may identify a wide range of items that you want to keep too. At the same time, you probably want to remove as many items from your house to show off the true size and beauty of your home to potential buyers.

Ultimately, it helps to evaluate storage options prior to decluttering. This will ensure that you have plans in place to store myriad items as you start to remove clutter from your house.

Many home sellers choose to rent storage units for their personal belongings. These units generally can be rented on a monthly basis and enable home sellers to keep their belongings safe until their houses are sold. Furthermore, it may be beneficial to pick up storage bins to temporarily store myriad belongings in your house's attic or basement.

If you need extra assistance as you prepare to declutter your house, it frequently helps to reach out to a real estate agent. This housing market professional can offer expert decluttering tips, as well as guide you along the home selling journey.

A real estate agent will set up home showings and open house events, negotiate with a buyer's agent on your behalf and much more. Therefore, with a real estate agent on your side, you can increase the likelihood of a quick, profitable home selling experience.

Ready to declutter and list your residence? Follow the aforementioned steps, and you can eliminate clutter and move closer to selling your house.


Although you have a 1 mile convenience to I-93, you will enjoy a quiet park like setting at this "end of the road" location. The home suits many needs. It's great for downsizing from the big house. It's great for raising a small family, and it's great for just getting started. A main floor master bedroom allows for one level living, with a whole separate living space in the walk out lower level. Enjoy a beverage after work, take a hot tub after a day on the slopes, or relax with a book on the expansive deck. The White Mountains are your surroundings. Hike Franconia Notch - Ski Cannon, Bretton Woods, or Loon Mountain. There are so many choices for recreation - bike the back roads, kayak the lakes, snowmobile to Vermont, hunt for the "big one", or cool off in the local swimming holes. The village of Bethlehem is a couple of miles away and offers great little restaurants, funky stores, artsy movies and live concerts at the Colonial Theater. Littleton, the hub town, is where the loc

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